Tagged: Ted Williams

Ten Years Changes A Team- Infield And DH

I was playing MLB 2K8 the other day on my Wii. I was the Royals and I was trying to make them a good team. In the game they are the 29th best team. The worst team is the Marlins but that would be to easy to make them good. I went to 2015 and won a World Series with guys like Ryan Zimmerman and Zack Greinke winning the MVP and Cy Young. I played four more seasons till 2019. I actually played one of the games against the Red Sox. Most of the games I just sim. It showed Michael Bowden on the mound for Boston. That got me thanking. What would the Red Sox be like in ten years . . .

I see a very young team that is like the Marlins in some ways. The rotation would be great, young, with the experience needed to go all the way. The lineup would have guys all over who could hit the ball every where. There would be homers around the Pesky Pole, doubles off the monster, and singles that would fall for base hits. Players like Jason Varitek, Mike Lowell, and Tim Wakefiled would be a thing of the past. Jeff Bailey, Lars Anderson, and Luis Exposito will be the present.
At first base will be Lars Anderson. Anderson will make his major league debut in 2011. His first three seasons will be from the bench but then when Mike Lowell turns 40 and retires Anderson will get the full time spot at third. Over time his home run totals will go up from ten to twenty to thirty to thirty-five in 2019. Most of Anderson’s home runs will be line drives. Unlike some players who golf when they swing Anderson has a very smooth swing. Anderson will improve his eye and will lead the league in walks sometime around 2017. He will not win Rookie of the Year due to the fact that his first few seasons will be played from the bench. However in 2019 he will be in MVP talks. Anderson will have a pretty good OBP and a decent average around .285 in 2019. Anderson will be a lot like Justin Morneau of the Twins once he gets called up.
At second it is a no brainer. Dustin Pedroia will still be there. He will be 35 but will still be standing strong. Over the next ten years his home run numbers will increase to twenty in 2014. They will stay like that till 2017 when they will start to decrease. Pedroia will steal more stolen bases as he gets older. In 2017 he will start to decline in that stat along with hits, RBI’s, and OBP. Pedroia will still be the same Pedroia and will be a leader on and off the field. While I am highly doubtful there is a chance that he could become captain of the Red Sox once Jason Varitek retires. Pedroia will make numerous all-star teams and will be the starter at most of them till 2017. Pedroia may have already won an MVP but will still improve till 2017 when he will exit his prime and Boston will probably draft a good talented second baseman. One that will have to follow up a Hall of Fame carer.
Shortstop will be Jed Lowrie. Lowrie will never be a power hitter but like Pedroia will get younger legs as he gets older. His carer high for home runs in a season will probably be fifteen but will have an average higher then .300 for his carer along with a high OBP. He will improve his fielding skills and will start to become a leader. Jed will be 35 like Pedroia. He will not though have a Hall of Fame carer like Dusty though. Even though Jed is not the best fielder and could improve his arm he will win around two Golden Gloves sometime around 2013. Lowrie will probably make four all-star games and will start at one. Jed will be a franchise player who will play only for Boston. He will get into the Red Sox Hall of Fame but will not have 3,000 hits or 500 home runs. He will probably have 2,500 hits and 200 home runs for his carer.
At third is Youk. Mike Lowell will retire in 2014 when he turns 40. Youk will move across the diamond and Boston will put Anderson at first. Youk will have a great carer. In 2011 he will win an MVP. By the time he turns 40 (which would be in 2019) Youkilis will have had 475 home runs and 2,500 hits. Youkilis will win around five SIlver Sluggers and eight Golden Gloves, six at first and two at third. Youk has a chance to break Ted Wiliams’ all-time care OBP which is .4817. However by then it could be held by Albert Pujols. Youk also has a chance to break Barry Bond’s single season record for OBP which is .609. Youk gets on base what seems like every time. Youk’s offensive carer will be a lot like Jim Rice’s just better and it will only take him thirteen tries to get into the Hall of Fame.
Catcher is a problem. Jason Varitek will most likely retire after 2010 which is the last year of his contract. Boston could have George Kottaras become the everyday catcher. Luis Exposito is promising but is only in A ball. Jarrod Saltalamacchia was nearly traded to Boston this offseason. I believe all three will get the chance the next few years. I believe Boston will traded for Saltalamacchia this offseason. Kottaras will stay as Tim Wakefield’s catcher till Wakefield retires. Exposito though will be the catcher in 2019.
Luis Exposito will be 32 in 2019. Exposito is pretty balanced but that is not much of a good thing as he does not hit a ton of home runs but will have a higher average. However he could hit twenty-five home runs in his prime. His arm could use some work when trying to throw out base stealers but is  great at blocking pitches. He has a strong arm but could work on his accuracy. From what I know and I do not know much about him he is very popular in the clubhouse and seems to be a fan favorite. He will probably make his debut in 2013 and will start at catcher in 2014. I am not so sure about him but he has five years to prove himself to me. 
Big Papi will retire at the age of 43 which would be in 2019. Big Papi by then will have made seven all-star games and will have won six silver-sluggers. Big Papi will have hit nearly 500 home runs by then and will hit number 500 in 2019. Big Papi will have had 2,500 hits when he retires. Ortiz will continue to be a fan favorite and after Varitek retires he has a chance to become the captain. However I believe Pedroia is more likely to become captain. Papi will retire with 515 home runs which will be good enough for twenty on the all time home run list. Big Papi will be just like “The Hit Dog” just he is going to get into the Hall Of Fame.
After Big Papi retires the job is up in the air. I think Boston will draft a D.H. in the next five years. If he is not ready Jeff Bailey will take over for one season. However I do not think that will be a problem. Whoever does follow Big Papi will have to follow someone who is the greatest D.H. of all time.
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#9 Ted Williams

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45. Behind the Mask (Bengie Molina)
46. The Max
47. Disco Hayes
48. Brian Anderson’s House of Blogs
49. Hardball in the Rockies
50. B3: Big, Bald and Beautiful

Number 9 okay. At first I was upset that I did not improve and dropped five spots but I am still honored to be in the top ten. Look at that three Red Sox blogs in the top ten. Julia’s Rants, The Future Blog of the Red Sox, and mine. Confessions of a She-Fan took home the prize again for being number one. Not trying to be mean but I think a book author should be considered a pro blog. They write a book for money but good job guys. I really don’t have much time so I thought since you guys never read my final Ted Williams’ essay I would let you guys read it. Please note that I wanted to use all of your guys’ thoughts but each paragraph could only be so long.

Ted Williams:

A True American Hero

 

By: Bob

2-6-2009

P2-R3

 

Ted Williams once said, “Baseball is the only field of endeavor where a man can succeed three time out ten and be considered a good performer.” Williams succeeded four times out of ten three different seasons. He was such a good hitter that only Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, Ed Delahanty, and Tris Speaker have a higher batting average then Ted Williams. Williams’ batting average could have been even higher had he not been called into the army. Besides playing baseball and being in the army he was also a baseball manager, a world class angler, a hunter, and campaigned for the Jimmy Fund; a charity for cancer. Ted Williams could have been the most risk-taking and caring baseball player ever. 

Ted Williams had a poor and tough childhood, but that eventually changed for the better. Williams was born as Theodore Samuel Williams on August 30, 1918, in San Diego, California. Williams’ dad was a sheriff and once arrested his brother for selling all the furniture in his house. Williams played all of his 19 seasons in major league baseball with the Boston Red Sox, where his career stats and awards included a .344 batting average, 521 home runs, 2,654 hits, 1,839 RBI’s, two American League MVP, 17 all-star selections, and two batting triple crowns guarding the Green Monster out in left field. From May 1944 to November 1945 Ted was in World War II and from August 1942 to April 1944 he was in military training to join the Marine Corps as a fighter pilot. Nearly eight years later Williams was called into the Korean war where he spent almost two years. In 1966 he made the Baseball Hall of Fame with 282 votes out of 302, 93.38% of the vote and had his number, 9 retired by the Boston Red Sox. Later in his life Williams started fishing and hunting and became a world class angler. On July 5,2002 he died a day after the Forth of July and a day before the major league baseball all-star game. Ted Williams’ life got much better and if it didn’t he wouldn’t be the true American hero he is today. 

Ted Williams is a huge risk-taker because he was in the army. I believe a risk-taker is someone who enters and does different things and or tasks with courage and bravery doing it. They also strongly defend in what they believe in. Ted Williams was in the Marine Corps as a fighter pilot which is a huge risk to do. Williams was in two wars, World War II and the Korean War, which is another gigantic risk. He won 13 awards for his outstanding military work. I believe anyone in the army is a huge risk-taker.

Ted Williams was naturally caring, mostly to kids. I think a caring person is someone who respects others and finds ways to make someone’s life better. Williams was caring because he campaigned for the Jimmy Fund Foundation; a charity for cancer. Williams would make bedside trips to sick kids in the hospital with cancer. Williams was so caring that there is a statue outside of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox with him taking of his hat and putting it on a kid’s head. Ted Williams was a caring person to every child he saw.

Ted Williams was a risk-taker with a caring nature. If Williams had not taken risks, he might not have been so successful in life. Although he won many baseball, military, and fishing awards he didn’t let that go to his head and served and helped others. He showed he cared about others and as a result, even though he has been dead for a several years, people still care about Ted Williams today.


Photo

1-espn.go.com/classic/



Before I go I thought of a new way to hopefully get more readers, baseball trivia! Julia since you started this if you do not want me to do this just tell me. Whoever gets it right first will get there name in tomorrows blog. Some times I might give multiply choice or give a hint if no one gets it or it is just really hard. Here is the first question.


Who played the most games for one major league team.


Hint- Not Hank Aaron

Ted Williams Report- Rough Draft

As some of you know I have to do a report on Ted Williams for school. This report isn’t just about his life. My teacher gave us a list of traits that are person showed and I chose caring and risk-taking. Please comment on any suggestions you have for it. Thanks Bob.

Ted Williams:

A True American Hero

 

By: Bob

2-4-2009

P2-R3

 

Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, Ed Delahanty, Tris Speaker, and Billy Hamilton are the only baseball players with a higher batting average then Ted Williams. Williams’ batting average could have been even higher had he not been called into the army. Besides playing baseball and being in the army he was also a baseball manager, a world class angler, a hunter, and campaigned for the Jimmy Fund, a charity for cancer. Ted Williams could have been the most risk-taking and caring baseball player ever. 

Ted Williams as a kid had a poor, tough life, but that eventually changed for the better. Williams was born as Theodore Samuel Williams on August 30, 1918, in San Diego, California. Williams’ dad was a sheriff and once arrested his brother for selling all the furniture in his house. Williams played all of his 19 seasons in major league baseball with the Boston Red Sox, where his career stats and awards included a .344 batting average, 521 home runs, 2,654 hits, 1,839 RBI’s, two American League MVP, 17 all-star selections, and two batting triple crowns. From May 1944 to November 1945 Ted was in World War II and from August 1942 to April 1944 he was in military training to join the Navy as a fighter pilot. Nearly eight years later Williams was called into the Korean war where he spent almost two years. In 1966 he made the baseball hall of fame with 282 votes out of 302, 93.38% of the vote and had his number, 9 retired by the Boston Red Sox. Later in his life Williams started fishing and hunting and became a world class angler. On July 5,2002 he died a day after the Forth of July and a day before the major league baseball all-star game. Ted Williams’ life got much better and if it didn’t he wouldn’t be the true American hero he is today. 

Ted Williams is a huge risk-taker because he was in the army. I believe a risk-taker is someone who enters and does different things and or tasks with courage and bravery doing it. They also strongly defend in what they believe in. Ted Williams was in the Navy as a fighter pilot which is a huge risk to do. Williams was in two wars, World War II and the Korean War, which is another gigantic risk. He won 13 awards for his outstanding military work. I believe anyone in the army is a huge risk-taker.

Ted Williams was naturally caring, mostly to kids. I think a caring person is someone who respects others finds ways to make someone’s life better. Williams was caring because he campaigned for the Jimmy Fund Foundation, a charity for cancer. Williams would make bedside trips to sick kids in the hospital with cancer. Williams was so caring that there is a statue outside of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox with him taking of his hat and putting it on a kid. Ted Williams was a caring person to every kid he saw.

Ted Williams was a risk-taker with a caring nature. If Williams had not taken risks, he might not have been so successful in life. Although he won many baseball, military, and fishing awards he didn’t let that go to his head and served and helped others. He showed he cared about others and a result, even though he has been dead for a several years, People still care about Ted Williams today.

“Baseball is the only field of endeavor where a man can succeed three times out of ten and be considered a good performer”

– Ted Williams

 

28-20=8!

First- I had written an entry about this but right before I left to see a movie it wouldn’t save and it vanished.

Second- Officially my godmother’s husband, Mark Neely became to Padres play by play announcer. Click here to learn more. Come on Mark, start an MLBlog.
Third- I found out my baseball team. It is the Angels. At first I was upset it wasn’t the Red Sox but at lest it is not the Yankees.
Forth- A lot of baseball news the past few days.
Magic 8 Ball
In case you don’t know Eat, Sleep, Baseball made number 8 on the latest leader list under fan blogs! I found out about this today because yesterday I had stuff. Like a basketball game that my team won 48-7! Last time was the first time I made the list as 28 and now I’m number 8! Before today my goal was to be 21 so I could put this on my blog.
21jim.jpg
Okay I out it in any way. This was a pretty good movie. Okay before I go on I would like to dedicate my number 8 to Carl Yastrzemski. Yaz played 23 seasons all with the Boston Red Sox. He was mostly a left fielder but also played third base and first base. He hit .285, with 452 home runs, 1,844 RBI’s, 1,816 runs scored, 168 stolen bases, and had 3,419 hits in 3,308 games. He made 14 all-star games, won seven golden gloves, and won one MVP. The year he won the 1967 A.L. MVP he won the batters triple crown batting .326, with 121 RBI’s, and 44 home runs. Yaz was one of the four great Red Sox left fielders joining Ted Williams, Jim Rice, and that Manny guy. hey Manny was Manny but he still did good playing with the Red Sox. Yaz was one of the greatest Red Sox players ever and one of the greatest players ever in the whole history of the MLB. In 1989 he made it in to the baseball hall of fame on his first try with 423 votes, 94.6%. That same year he had his number eight retired by the Red Sox.
https://i2.wp.com/artfiles.art.com/images/-/Carl-Yastrzemski---Legendsof-the-Game-Composite---Photofile-Photograph-C10106790.jpegCarl Yastrzemski on Sports Illustrated cover
Here is the full list.
Pro Blogs
1. Hot Stove Blog
2. Bombers Beat
3. Inside the Dodgers
4. MLB.com Fantasy 411
5. Obviously, You’re Not a Golfer
6. CastroTurf
7. Postcards from Elysian Fields
8. Brownie Points
9. Twins Confidential
10. Beck’s Blog
11. Inside the Giants Clubhouse
12. The Baseball Collector
13. Around the Horn in KC
14. *touch* ’em all
15. Newberg Report
16. MLBlogosphere (lol)
17. kevin slowey’s (offseason) blog
18. Phillies Insider
19. Dining with ‘Dre (Andre Ethier)
20. Red Sox Insider Blog
21. Bally’s Blog (Collin Balester)
22. Tommy Lasorda’s World
23. Inside the White Sox
24. B3: Big, Bald and Beautiful
25. Twins Ballpark Update
26. MLB.com Organizational Report
27. Major League Bastian
28. Ben’s Biz Blog
29. 2009 Reds Winter Caravan
30. Perk’s Place (Glen Perkins)
31. Vine Line’s Cubs Club Blog
32. Friar John’s Blog
33. MLB Urban Youth Academy
34. got milb?
35. Comerica Park, 48201
36. Brian Anderson’s House of Blogs
37. Siguiendo a los Mets
38. MURRAY COOK’S FIELD BLOG
39. A ‘Braves’ New World
40. Down the Line with the Phillies Ballgirls
41. Yankee Stadium Memories
42. It’s a Kind of a Family. It’s a Kind of Insanity.
43. Behind the Mask (Bengie Molina)
44. Shane Victorino’s Postseason Blog
45. Scorpion Tales: C.J. Wilson’s trek across the blogosphere
46. Inside the Chiefs
47. Extra Innings with the K Crew
48. MLB.com Geeking on the Draft
49. Reds Crew Official Blog
50. A’s Thru Z

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3. Ranger Rumors
4. Julia’s Rants
5. The ‘Burgh Blues
6. Rockpile Rant
7. Statistician Magician
8. Eat, Sleep, Baseball
9. Prince of New York
10. Rays Renegade
11. FutureAngels.com
12. Phillies Phollowers
13. The Future Blog of the Red Sox
14. THE BOSTON RED SOX BLOG
15. Baseball, The Yankees, and Life…
16. Life Outside the Diamond is a Wrench
17. Rocky Mountain Way…Outside Coors looking in
18. Go Redlegs!
19. Blogging Dodgers and Baseball
20. A Diatribe from a Law Student: Baseball Edition
21. I Live for This
22. Unfinished Business
23. DIAMONDS ARE A GIRLS BEST FRIEND
24. Baseball’s Hottest Wives
25. King of Cali
26. Baseball Cleats & Shoes
27. Bruce Markusen’s Cooperstown Confidential
28. All Baseball All The Time
29. Hardball
30. Bringing Diamond Back(s)
31. Yogi Brewer
32. Cambios y Curvas
33. Plunking Gomez
34. Yankees Chick
35. LA NACION MEDIAS ROJAS
36. Phillies Red Pinstripes
37. Yawkey Way Yaker
38. The Rumor Mill – MLB Rumors
39. Baby Paul’s Baseball Blog
40. We’re talkin Homer, Blue Jays and MLB
41. Made In San Diego
42. Pick Me Up Some Mets!
43. Love of The Game: Through 2 Different Pairs of Eyes
44. Cardinal Girl
45. Diamondhacks
46. The Happy Youngster…Brew Town’s Ballhawk
47. Perfect Pitch
48. Baseball Bats
49. District Boy
50. The Yankees Baseball Whisperer

Goals For Next Time

– Stay in the top 10.
– Get 12 comments on one entry.
– Solve one of Mark’s Latest Leader Identity Contest.
– Pass Julia, okay that’s really hard.

Congrats To…

Julia for getting 4.
Elizabeth for getting 13.
Steve for getting 14.
Kaybee for getting 22.
Ben for getting 29.
Xcicix for getting 30.
Hyun Young for getting 41.
Aaron for getting 49.
Lisa for getting 34 (Big Papi’s number) on the pro blog list.
And every one who made the list.

Boston We Don’t Have A Problem

First- Brad Hawpe will play for team USA.

Second- Yesterday I did eight entries and my hard work paid off. On mlblogs home page my blog was featured on the hall balloting blogs!
Third- I’m doing a report on Ted Williams if any one knows some stuff about him please comment on it.
              Ted WilliamsTed WilliamsTed WilliamsTed Williams
Jim Rice and Rickey Henderson got elected to the baseball hall of fame. Henderson got 511 votes, 94.8%. Jim Rice got 412 votes, 76.4%. I guess yesterday I was to generous yesterday. Mark Grace, David Cone, Matt Williams, Mo Vaughn, Jay Bell, and Jesse Orosco got less then 5% of the vote while Orosco got one vote. Ron Gant, Dan Plesac, and Greg Vaughn didn’t get a vote. The person who got the most votes and didn’t get in was Andre Dawson with 361 votes, 67%. The player with the most votes who was on the ballot for the first time was Jim Rice only made it in by seven votes but I am sure he will take that. Yesterday I predicted that Rice would just get in by a few votes, one or two. It was a little bigger but it was still pretty close. Rice got in on his fifteenth and last time joining Red Ruffing and Ralph Kiner as the only people to get in on their last time on the ballot. Jim Rice will now get his number retired by the Red Sox. The two rules to get your number retired by the Red Sox are you must be elected to the baseball hall of fame and you must have played ten years with the Red Sox. The unofficial rule is you must finish your carer with the Red Sox. The only exception was to Johnny Pesky who was with the Red Sox for 21 years as a player, coach, and manager. When Johnny Pesky went up for election for the hall of fame in 1960 he got one vote, 0.4%. The only exception to the unofficial rule (which really doesn’t make it unofficial if there has been and exception) was to Carlton Fisk who finished his carer with the Chicago White Sox. Rickey Henderson played with the Red Sox in 2002. He hit .223, with five home runs, drove in 16, scored 40 times, stole eight, and was caught stealing twice in 72 games. One difference between the two is Henderson played for the Yankees. Henderson though was mostly an Oakland Athletic. Henderson’s number will obviously not be retired by the Red Sox but his work will be thought of. Congrats to both Henderson and Rice and best wishes to Dawson, Bert Blyleven, Lee Smith, Jack Morris, and the others. Now the eyes are on Roberto Alomar, Andres Galarrage, Barry Larkin, Edgar Martinez, Fred McGriff, and Robin Ventura who are on the ballot for the first time.